My Job

Standard

Yesterday at work, I was sitting in / at (whichever preposition I’m supposed to use) my cubicle, when I overheard two managers talking at a cubicle near me.

This is what I heard, followed by which manager said it:

“Stephanie…” – my actual boss

“…won’t be able to stay…” – my actual boss

“Oh okay. Thank you for the heads up.” – manager who does the hiring interviews

I had half an hour left of my work day, at that point. It was difficult for me to work quickly. I was too busy worrying that I may not be permanently hired. (I am working as a temp-to-hire.)

I talked to Human Resources, before I left for the day. They said that I have more than 100 work hours, before I am eligible to be permanently hired.

Some of you are close enough friends that you’ve kept up with how well I’ve been doing at work. Because of this, I half-knew I had nothing to worry about, but I still couldn’t let it go that I thought they had already decided not to hire me.

I was given advice from friends, but one friend (in particular) gave me specific instructions on how to handle the situation.

So, I took the advice.

At 7:54am, this morning, I walked up to my boss’ desk. I asked her when a good time would be to ask her a question, privately. She looked worried. She said, “At 9am, unless it’s about you wanting to leave [the job].”

I shook my head and assured my worried-looking boss that I have absolutely no plans to leave my job.

At 9am, I walked up the her desk again. She said that she was still working on reports and would need more time. I asked how long. “10 more minutes,” she said.

I waited until 9:11am. I was doing my work, until then, but I’m very precise with things like this. I didn’t want to seem crazy, by walking up to her desk exactly 10 minutes later, so I waited an extra minute.

This time, she (again) said that it would have to wait. I sat down and worked, until 11:45am. I clocked out for lunch, at 11:46am. My lunch is one half hour, in duration.

I got back to the office and clocked in, at 12:17pm. I needed to make up for clocking in a minute too early (earlier, this morning).

My boss called me over to the “let’s talk privately” area, eventually. It was abrupt, so I apologize for not remembering the exact time. (hehe…) It was around 1pm.

I sat down with her and wasn’t sure how to begin, but my brain can always come up with something to say.

“I didn’t sleep much last night, so I think I’m compensating for that, today.”

She said nothing. I remembered that I was clocked in and needed to hurry up and communicate.

I said, “Yesterday, before I left, I talked to Human Resources. They said I have over 100 hours, before you make a decision whether to hire me.”

She said, “Yes. We’ll set up a review, after those hours pass.”

I told her, “Well, I overheard something yesterday and it was the reason I spoke to Human Resources. I heard my name spoken and that made me want to listen. Then, I heard, ‘…won’t be able to stay…’.”

My boss looked relieved. She said that she thought I was having a social problem in the office.

(I quit talking to most of my co-workers, after a couple of misunderstandings that the other people involved my boss in. I know you’d say that I may be perceiving things wrong, but some of these female co-workers seriously “don’t like me,” except that they don’t know me, at all.)

My boss quickly filled in the blanks of the conversation; the parts that I didn’t hear.

—————————————————————

Here it is / was:

“Is everyone going to be able to stay, today, for overtime?” – manager who does hiring interviews

“Stephanie won’t be able to stay. She is still with _____________________ (TEMP AGENCY), who won’t pay overtime.” – my boss

“Oh okay, thank you for the heads up.” – manager who does hiring interviews

—————————————————————-

She continued to talk with me, which made me feel even more secure in my job.

(Part of the conversation was that I will be trained for a new process, next week – which will make me more of an asset to the company. Enough that I’ll probably keep this job for 2-5+ years. I love to feel secure.)

We’ve spoken on a semi-personal level, before. She’s aware that I have Asperger’s Syndrome. She’s aware that I over-think things. (I really can’t hide that.) She’s aware that unless I speak about what I’m mulling over, I’m inwardly distracted and can’t work as efficiently.

She says that her son is a lot like me and that he gets it from her… but she’s had to learn how to deal with it while at work.

She compared herself to me, in that I don’t speak to very many people at work. She was the same, when she first started working there. She also has a problem with people getting in her personal space.

I asked her if she’d rather that I email her, when I need reassurance that I’m secure in my job.

She (happily) said yes. She added that unless she’s “in my face” or “standing over my shoulder” all day, my job is not in jeopardy. She didn’t seem annoyed. She didn’t rush the conversation’s end. She seemed relieved to be able to take a break and talk to someone that she could relate to.

I think my job is safe. 🙂